October 19, 2020

SFCC: Chaine des Rotisseurs Dinner June 20

first_imgJerry Dakan, SFCC Lead Chef-InstructorPeter O’Brien, Inn of the AnasaziCharles Dale, Dalicious Concepts LLCFernando Olea, SazónEvan Doughty, Santa Fe Brewing Co.Kyle Pacheco, Santa Fe School of CookingJen Doughty, Jimmy D’sCristian Pontiggia, SassellaDavid Flores, Lucky GoatCooking with Kids Junior ChefsPatrick Mares, SFCC Lead Chef-InstructorSFCC Culinary Arts Student Chaîne des Rôtisseurs Santa Fe Chapter presents a fundraising dinner benefiting Cooking with Kids and SFCC Culinary Arts students at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, June 20 at Santa Fe Community College, Jemez Rooms, 6401 Richards Ave. in Santa Fe. SFCC News: All chefs are inducted members of the Chaîne des Rôtisseurs: Chaîne des Rôtisseurs, the world’s oldest international gastronomic society was founded in Paris in 1248. It is devoted to preserving the camaraderie and pleasures of the table and to promoting excellence in all areas of the hospitality arts. The society sponsors young chef and sommelier competitions and the Chaîne Foundation provides scholarships for students.center_img SFCC Foundation is a nonprofit organization that supports SFCC’s mission and helps students succeed by removing financial barriers including tuition and fees, textbooks, transportation and childcare. Cooking with Kids educates and empowers children and families to make healthy food choices through hands-on learning with fresh, affordable foods. Started in 1995, Cooking with Kids works in classrooms and cafeterias, teaching thousands of public school children in Santa Fe and Española every year. Santa Fe Community College has been the gateway to success for individuals and the community for more than 35 years by providing affordable, high-quality educational programs in its credit, noncredit and adult education programs that serve the social, cultural, technological and economic needs of the community.last_img read more

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October 18, 2020

City view: James Whitmore

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October 18, 2020

PAHO urges countries to plan early for COVID-19 vaccinations to reduce deaths

first_img She said that when vaccines become available, the COVAX Facility, convened by GAVI, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) “will afford countries in our region the best opportunity to fast-track access to COVID-19 vaccines and reduce the impact of the pandemic on people’s lives and our economies. More deaths from COVID-19 recorded in CARICOM countries,… Dr. Etienne said nearly 200 COVID-19 vaccine candidates are being studied ‘and we hope that one or more of these will prove to be effective, but there is no guarantee. She told reporters that even as a vaccine is rolled out “this virus will continue to spread, and people will continue to get sick, so we cannot pin all our hope on vaccines alone. She said PAHO is well prepared to offer technical cooperation to countries so they can prepare and implement their vaccination campaigns “from planning and forecasting to communications, from regulations to the training of health personnel. Oct 16, 2020 Oct 16, 2020 “And we’ll continue to count on people exercising social distancing, washing their hands often and wearing masks in public to protect others from getting sick,” the PAHO Director said. “Frontline health workers, first responders and those caring for the elderly should be vaccinated first, followed by vulnerable groups such as adults with pre-existing conditions, especially those over 65 years of age,” Dr. Etienne said, adding that ‘the challenge lies in identifying these groups early and determining how to best reach them.” Countries in the Americas Pool Efforts to Ensure Access to COVID-19 VaccinesThe director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), Dr. Carissa Etienne, Tuesday said countries in the Americas were pooling their efforts to ensure access to treatments and vaccines for coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. “Acting as a bloc, PAHO member states will benefit from our technical expertise, as well as our…July 16, 2020In “CARICOM”Guyana Government to set up COVID screening units in communities(Guyana Chronicle) In addition to the setting up of COVID-19 hotlines across the country, steps are being taken to operationalise COVID-19 screening units at “hot spots” where a significant number of reports come from, according to officials from the Health and Emergency Operations Centre (HEOC), which is coordinating the country’s…April 15, 2020In “CARICOM”CARPHA Upgrades the Risk of Transmission of Coronavirus in the Caribbean to Moderate to HighWhile there have been no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the Caribbean thus far, transmission of the virus has been reported in territories with direct flights to Caribbean States.  Therefore, due to the current increased risk of importation of COVID-19 to the Region, the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) has…February 28, 2020In “Antigua & Barbuda”Share this on WhatsApp She said the COVAX facility, including the Advanced Market Commitment financing instrument, has signed up 64 self-financing countries and 92 countries eligible for support through that instrument. “We’ll still need diagnostics to identify those who are sick and better treatments to care for those that fall ill. We’ll continue to rely on traditional public health measures like tests, contact tracing and quarantines to minimize the spread of this virus. Oct 15, 2020center_img Oct 16, 2020 “Early vaccines may only provide partial protection or may not work for everyone. We don’t yet know which vaccine will be found safe and effective and how it will work. But we do know that if we don’t prepare now, we will miss the opportunity to benefit from it quickly. The truth is countries can’t wait to have all of the answers before they start planning and preparing to deliver a COVID vaccine,” Dr. Etienne added. CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak “”The COVAX facility offers access to a basket of 15 possible vaccines,” she said. “Another benefit to our member states is that they can rely on our Revolving Fund, the biggest regional mechanism for self-financing countries, for the purchase and delivery of vaccines,” she said, adding “so, I urge countries around the world to prepare for a coronavirus vaccine, but also to remain realistic, knowing that these preparations do not replace everything else we must do to save lives today”. Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Director of the Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO), Dr. Carissa Etienne Wednesday warned that countries should continue public health measures such as social distancing, handwashing and wearing masks in public, as it may take time before people receive a vaccine to treat the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Dr. Etienne said through COVAX, participating countries will be guaranteed initial doses to cover at least three per cent of their population in the first phases of deployment, as supplies catch up with global demand, eventually reaching 20 per cent of their population – enough to protect those at higher risk for severe COVID-19. “Our region has a strong legacy of immunization programs that give us a leg up as we plan for the future,” she added. CARPHA Partners with, PAHO to Ensure Caribbean States’… You may be interested in… Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC last_img read more

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October 18, 2020

IAC Group Appoints Natale Rea As President And Interim CEO

first_imgRobert Miller.International Automotive Components Group (IAC), a global automotive and mobility leader in lightweight and new-material interior solutions, has announced that Natale “Nat” Rea has been appointed president and interim CEO, effective immediately. Robert “Steve” Miller is retiring from IAC after three years as president and CEO. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementRea brings more than 40 years of automotive supplier experience. Prior to serving as president of his investment firm, Rea Holdings Inc. from 2012 to 2018, he served as president of the Automotive Division at Martinrea International Inc, one of the world’s largest producers of lightweight cast aluminum engine blocks, transmission housings and structural components. Martinrea was formed in 2002 when Rea International Inc. merged with another supplier. “We are thrilled to welcome Nat to IAC,” said IAC Group Chairman Stephen Toy, senior managing director and co-head of WL Ross & Co. “Nat’s in-depth knowledge of the industry combined with his operational experience and proven track record of driving growth makes him an ideal addition to IAC’s senior management team. We thank Steve Miller for his significant contributions to IAC over the past three years, including the development of our long-range strategic plan, the establishment of our joint venture, Auria Solutions Ltd. with Shanghai Shenda Co. Ltd., as well as the successful recapitalization of the company and wish him well in his future endeavors.”Miller joined IAC in 2015. He is widely recognized for his broad operational experience, brings years of automotive supplier and OEM experience to IAC, previously serving as a board member of Federal-Mogul Corp. from 1993 to 2005 and as interim CEO during a portion of that period. He served as chairman and CEO of Bethlehem Steel Corp. from 2001 to 2003 and as chairman and CEO of Delphi Corp. from 2005 until 2006 and held the executive chairman position from January 2007 until Delphi’s Chapter 11 emergence in 2009. AdvertisementMiller has considerable executive leadership experience, serving as a member of boards of directors in a variety of industries, such as consumer products (Coleman, Reynolds American and Kendall Jackson), financial services (US Bancorp and American International Group) and industrials (United Airlines, Syntex, Pope & Talbot and Waste Management). He currently serves as a director of Dow Chemical; internet security software company Symantec Corp.; and global insurance conglomerate American International Group. He also is chairman of the private equity firm MidOcean Partners.Miller began his career in 1968 at Ford Motor Co. and after more than a decade there joined Chrysler Corp., where he worked for 13 years, eventually serving as vice chairman. While at Chrysler, all international automotive operations and non-automotive operations reported to him. He then joined New York investment bank James D. Wolfensohn Inc. as a senior partner from 1992 to 1993. In 1995, Miller was appointed chairman of the board of engineering, construction, mining and environmental services firm Morrison Knudsen Corp. from April 1995 until September 1996, overseeing financial restructuring and the merger with Washington Construction. Miller was then named vice chairman of the board (renamed Washington Group) until February 2002.He is a graduate of Stanford University and received his J.D. from Harvard Law School and his Master of Business Administration degree from Stanford University Graduate School of Business. Miller also is the author of a well-received autobiography published in 2008.last_img read more

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October 6, 2020

DW: Decommissioning firms to benefit from oil price collapse

first_imgThe oil price collapse has been bad news for nearly every company involved in the industry, but one group that could actually benefit from it are specialist decommissioning companies, Douglas-Westwood, an energy intelligence group, has said in its DW Monday report. According to Douglas-Westwood, for these companies there is an opportunity to be part of removing the huge tonnage of infrastructure that exists in the North Sea. With oil prices forecast to remain low, life extension work that has kept many North Sea platforms producing long past their design life no longer makes commercial sense, DW explained. The Dunlin platform (producing since 1978) is an early casualty having been abandoned last year.Douglas-Westwood’s (DW) new North Sea Decommissioning Market Forecast 2016-2040 predicts that the UK will dominate decommissioning expenditure. Costs could exceed $50 billion using current removal methods or $43bn if SLVs (such as the Pioneering Spirit) are utilised. This $7bn saving, DW said, is due to the number of extra-large platforms that will require removal, which would lead to high costs using current techniques. The most common decommissioning method is reverse installation and while this is well established and safe, it is time consuming, resulting in high costs, said DW.According to the energy intelligence group, SLVs can complete lifts much quicker, lowering offshore costs substantially. This will only happen however, if the Pioneering Spirit is a success and embraced by the industry, something that will be required before other SLVs are commissioned, DW noted.DW says it anticipates that 146 platforms will be removed from the UK during 2019-2026 – 51% of all UK platform removals over the forecast. This is, DW explained, due to the high number of ageing platforms in the UK, which have an average age of over 20 years and are uneconomic at current commodity prices, as a result of high maintenance costs and the expensive production techniques required for mature fields. However, DW concluded, many of the largest platforms will remain in place until the 2030s, mainly due to tiebacks that have increased production late in life.last_img read more

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September 29, 2020

Feeling the benefit

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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September 28, 2020

Scot-free banking

first_img Eduardo Reyes is Gazette features editor Follow Eduardo on Twitter ‘Unbelievable!!!’ was the striking line in an email I received earlier this week from a trusted contact. It referenced a reported request by John Cridland, director general of the Confederation of British Industry, for banks to be protected from lawsuits related to the sale of products linked to Libor. ‘It would be a dangerous precedent if banks were to be held responsible for products sold that related to Libor,’ Cridland wrote in The Times. As the Gazette previously reported, even though the general effect of Libor-fixing was probably to depress rates, it is market movements triggering ‘opt-in’ and ‘opt-out’ provisions that are to blame. I find Cridland’s call staggering on two levels. First, politically, there will be many in his own business constituency whose interests would be harmed by such a move. And in fact the email I received came from one of the small and medium-sized business owners whose peers form the backbone to the CBI’s membership. Secondly, and this may be the ‘unbelievable’ part for Gazette readers, is it honestly his contention that a business that has suffered loss should have no redress? That should strike anyone as a civil law miscarriage of justice, if allowed. Finding a way to protect banks from such suits, out of fear that they are unaffordable, amounts nothing less than an extra tax on businesses to prop up the banks concerned. In the case of one bank alone, Cridland’s ‘get out of this free’ card would come at a rumoured $6bn cost to businesses. If Cridland’s proposal really were one that would, albeit through a gross unfairness, stabilise a reformed and penitent banking system, it would be a stronger one. However, the complaints that my ‘unbelievable!!!’ contact and his peers have about bank conduct are ongoing – not ancient history. The CBI’s leadership seems to have been ‘captured’ by the banks on this issue. How could that have happened? Well, maybe the depiction of defendant organisations as ‘victims’ pedaled by government is now infecting the CBI’s view of financial services litigation. last_img read more

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September 28, 2020

No welcome in the valleys for national firms, research finds

first_imgWelsh lawyers are unhappy with their government’s efforts to encourage English firms to expand into the country, a new study has found.Interviews with firms of all sizes in Wales found disquiet at the Welsh government’s attempt to encourage national firms into Cardiff to generate competition.Research carried out by Bangor University Law School on behalf of the government found Wales has the highest percentage of firms undertaking less lucrative areas of work, such as legal aid and residential conveyancing.In addition to threats to their income from government reforms of the legal sector, local firms are now worried about attempts to encourage national firms to set up on their turf.‘There seems to be resistance to the idea of internationalisation amongst the local large-firm profession,’ said the report.‘This may not be in their best long-term interests if Cardiff’s aspirations to become a major legal centre are to be realised.’Researchers found concern among large Welsh firms that expensively trained staff would leave for higher salaries at incoming national competitors.‘The policy of encouraging national firms to open offices in Cardiff raises sensitive issues amongst the local profession,’ added the report.‘Present [government] policy is perceived, rightly or wrongly, as creating more competition in a marketplace which is already saturated.’Firms told researchers that the government should revisit the eligibility criteria for grants available to domestic firms.They also want the government to encourage more national businesses to move to south Wales and to give more support generally to businesses in Wales. If a formula could be found for stimulating more business growth, then the larger south Wales firms could compete for that business.But as well as protection and assistance from the government, researchers found the Welsh legal sector must change to meet market challenges.In the report’s introduction, Professor Dermot Cahill, head of the law school, said the research had showed law firms and chambers need to develop more specialisations to make up for diminishing traditional areas of work.Despite Wales boasting several quality law schools turning out graduates with expertise in areas such as banking law, maritime law and international commercial law, few employment opportunities existed in the country in these areas.‘The Welsh government can play its part by reviewing the appropriateness of the supports it currently has on offer for practice expansion and development,’ said Prof Cahill.‘Existing supports are not meeting the development needs of law firms. Law firms and chambers should be looked on as a distinct SME [small and medium-sized enterprise] sector, with support tailored towards those seeking to develop high growth potential in new areas of practice.’By the end of last month, 3,788 solicitors had practising certificates in Wales, of which 2,811 were in private practice. A further 91 solicitors had PCs but were not in private practice.Wales has a total of 487 private practice firms employing solicitors along with five sets of chambers in Cardiff and two in Swansea.According to the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales, 3,435 students were studying law at Welsh universities in 2011/12, with Cardiff University accounting for 945 of those places.Every solicitor interviewed saw alternative business structures as a threat, but large and medium-sized firms had no plans to consider ABS status as an option in the immediate future.last_img read more

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September 26, 2020

Dominica to commence climate change resilient projects

first_imgLocalNews Dominica to commence climate change resilient projects by: – March 23, 2013 20 Views   3 comments Share The Ministry of Environment is working on establishing a project management unit to overseer the implementation of projects to guard against climate change.The World Bank has approved grant and concessionary loan funding of US$60 million to the island for the implementation of its climate resilient low carbon strategy.“We identified a number of priority areas …areas that we know that are going to be affected by climate change…We are right now about to enter the implementation stage meaning that all of these projects that have been submitted by the various government department have been approved,” Environment Minister Dr Kenneth Darroux said.The strategy which was submitted to the World Bank last year was “fully endorsed” according to the Minister. Prior to the approval of the strategy, several World Bank officials visited the island to review the projects submitted.“So we can look forward to some new exciting projects in the near future,” Dr Darroux said. One of the areas that the ministry plans to concentrate on among several others, will be infrastructure particularly some of the coastal roads.Dominica Vibes News Sharecenter_img Share Tweet Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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September 24, 2020

Learn how to do business with the City of Farmington Hills

first_img admin Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) Reported by Business owners who want to learn more about working with the City of Farmington Hills are invited to attend a workshop held Monday, February 25 at City Hall.During the 9 a.m. event in Council Chambers, city officials and representatives from the Purchasing Division will talk about the city’s bid process, the City’s e-procurement system, and how to learn about available contracts. City Department Directors will offer details on upcoming large projects, including local road construction and the re-purposing of Harrison High School into a Community Recreation and Arts Center.This event, co-hosted by the city and Greater Farmington Area Chamber of Commerce, includes a light breakfast and business card raffle. Register at gfachamber.com under the Events tab. To learn more, call 248-919-6917.last_img read more

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