October 18, 2020

Events: North West 2010 Property Conference and Awards

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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October 7, 2020

ROC Group – Gas and beyond

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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October 7, 2020

Cryogen-free technologies merger

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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October 7, 2020

Praxair-Linde merger on the right track

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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September 29, 2020

Volga-Dnepr flies power plant into Kaliningrad

first_imgThe cargo, which was carried on board one of Volga-Dnepr’s AN-124-100 freighters, was 20 m long and measured more than four m in height and width. When loading the plant, a ramp extension was used so that the trailer carrying the gas turbine could be reversed into the freighter aircraft.The Russian forwarding company, Instar Logistics, contracted the delivery with Volga-Dnepr on behalf of the JSC Mobile GTES, which is working on the project to modernise Kaliningrad’s energy system.The gas turbine power plant is one of the first being installed in the region and can be used as an auxiliary supply source in emergency situations. www.volga-dnepr.comlast_img

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September 28, 2020

This woman thought she had water in her ear. Doctors pulled out a spider.

first_img Author: CAITLIN O’KANE/CBSWriter:WINK News Most people know how it feels to have some water left in your ear after a shower or a dip in the pool. But a Kansas City woman was horrified to learn that in her case, that waterlogged feeling was actually caused by a venomous brown recluse spider lodged in her ear.Susie Torres told local Kansas City station KSHB she thought she had water stuck in her ear that wouldn’t go away, so she went to a doctor. The medical assistant who first checked her ear seemed to be shocked, and went to get more people. “She then said, ‘I think you have an insect in there,’” Torres told KSHB.Torres said she didn’t panic at that point, but shortly after, the medical assistant gave her a cringe-worthy reason that would freak anyone out. “She came back in and told me it was a spider,” Torres said.The medical staff used tools to get the spider out. Doctors told Torres it was a highly venomous brown recluse spider — which fortunately did not bite her.“I never thought they would crawl in your ear or any part of your body,” Torres said. She has no clue where the spider came from, but now she’s taking precautions to prevent any other arachnids from burrowing in her ear.“I went and put some cotton balls in my ear last night, because I did not have any ear plugs,” she said. “I’m pretty terrified of spiders.”According to the CDC, the brown recluse is one of two venomous spiders found in the U.S., along with black widows. “Spiders are usually not aggressive and most bites occur because a spider is trapped or unintentionally contacted,” the CDC says. So, Torres got lucky — she could’ve received a bite that would cause itching, pain, and irritation, or even, in rare cases, death.It wasn’t too long ago that doctors found a spider spinning a web inside a man’s ear in China, The Sun newspaper in the U.K. reports. The patient went to the doctor complaining of an “itchy crawling sensation” inside his ear and doctors saw the insect deep in his canal. They took video of the web-spinning spider, which went viral in May.Ear-dwelling spiders have made headlines other times before. In 2012, doctors in China found a spider that had been living in a woman’s ear for 5 days. And in 2007, an Oregon boy complaining of a faint popping sound “like Rice Krispies” ended up having two spiders removed from his ear. Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. SHAREcenter_img Published: August 23, 2019 1:04 PM EDT Updated: August 23, 2019 1:32 PM EDT KANSAS CITY (CBS) This woman thought she had water in her ear. Doctors pulled out a spider. last_img read more

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September 28, 2020

Morris Cheung

first_imgMorris Cheung has taken up the new role of European Business Director at MTR Corp, where he will be responsible for managing the growth of the business in Europe and the Middle East. Daniel Shim succeeds him on an interim basis as Human Resources Director while a permanent replacement is sought.last_img

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September 26, 2020

Nairobi governor to know whether he will be freed on Wednesday

first_imgNairobi Governor arrested after orders from the Public Prosecutions office Governor Sonko being arrested on Friday.PHOTO/Reuters The governor of Kenya’s capital Nairobi pleaded not guilty in court on Monday to corruption and other economic crimes involving millions of dollars.Kenya’s capital Nairobi’s Governor Mike Mbuvi Sonko (L) in Court.Nairobi Governor Mike Mbuvi Sonko was arrested on Friday and is accused of conspiracy to commit corruption, conflict of interest, failure to comply with laws related to procurement, unlawful acquisition of public property and laundering the proceeds of crime.A 44-year-old former senator, Sonko is a flamboyant figure, known for his glitzy lifestyle, flashy clothes, chunky gold jewelry and eye-catching hairstyles.He appeared before anti-corruption chief magistrate Douglas Ogoti on Monday dressed in a designer shirt sequined with a gold teddy bear under a hooded camouflaged jacket.Chief public prosecutor Noordin Haji has accused Sonko and his associates of the misappropriation of 357 million Kenyan shillings ($3.52 million).Ogoti said later on Monday that he would rule on Wednesday whether to grant bail to Sonko, other officials and businessmen and women charged alongside him. Ogoti ordered that they remain in custody until then.Related Former Nairobi Governor arrested again over graft allegationscenter_img Nairobi Governor Mike Sonko arraigned in courtlast_img read more

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September 25, 2020

Pay to play: Supply management in Montana’s dairy industry, Part 2

first_imgIn the last article, I introduced Montana’s supply management policy, also known as quota. Click here to view the article.To briefly recap: Montana is the only state in the U.S. with effective supply management, which has kept annual production around 280 million pounds since 1990.The amount of quota available has not changed since its institution, so farmers can only acquire more when others decide to sell, and price of quota varies based on demand.Quota ownership ensures farmers receive the highest pooled price for the corresponding amount of milk produced.So what does this mean for producers? How has quota impacted their on-farm decision-making? And in what ways do Montana dairy farmers think quota has affected the state’s industry?advertisementI wanted to know the answers to these questions, and because I was in graduate school, had dairy experience and wanted to study Montana dairies, a thesis attempting to understand the above questions was the perfect solution.In 2012, I began my research and in May 2013 completed and defended my thesis. I interviewed 17 dairy farmers from across the state, which included two retired farmers and one who processes on-farm.From the 14 farmers that are currently shipping milk, 12 are affiliated with Darigold and two with Meadow Gold. The size of the dairy herds reflected the range found in the state, from milking around 50 to more than 700 cows, with an average herd size of 268.All of the farmers are the primary owner-operators of their farm and have been in that role for an average of 30 years.Previous research from Canada and Europe discussed three primary effects of quota: cost, lowered competitive advantage and changing on-farm structural adjustment (for things like building new barns or putting in more advanced equipment).Results from these studies show that farmers are no less likely to upgrade their equipment but do spend more on operations than farmers in non-quota systems. A major effect was the potential loss of competitiveness with regions that do not use supply management, particularly when there are free-trade agreements.advertisementUsing these findings as a guide, I developed questions that would speak to the known effects of quota while also letting farmers share their thoughts.So what did Montana dairy farmers talk about? Cost of quota was a major, and often heated, topic of discussion, with 14 of 17 farmers bringing up the high cost at least once. The three farmers who did not discuss cost have some of the smallest herds in the state and have remained at or near their initial quota levels.Many farmers related buying more than 10,000 pounds of quota during the period when it was selling for $21 to $26 per pound. One farmer explained how quota affects his costs by saying, “If you have an 80-pound herd average, it costs you $2,000 to buy the quota for one cow at $25 [per pound].At $10, it would be $800. So it still costs me $800 every time I want to buy a cow, where in a non-quota system, that is not part of the equation.”Nine farmers brought up the issue that they think it is almost impossible financially to produce milk in Montana without quota. Over-quota milk is priced $1.50 lower than the highest blend price.When milk prices are high, the lower over-quota price is not so detrimental, but when milk prices are low, the differential can be the difference between making and losing money.One farmer explained, “when you are down to $15 [per hundredweight] and your excess is 13 and a half, then your margins are tighter, so you would like to have that extra $1.50. It probably becomes more important to us at that point to have our quota pounds and our production about the same.”Since farmers were given their quota for free when the system was initiated, some thought it might have enticed farmers to exit the industry earlier than they may have otherwise.One farmer explained that they had been “handed thousands of dollars of bonus that they could then sell,” while another noted that in the early years “virtually everyone that was selling quota was getting out.”While quota may have encouraged some people to retire, farmers felt that quota may have also created a situation that discourages new producers.Several farmers noted that they could not think of one new dairy farm since the start of quota, with one farmer saying, “It is keeping young dairies from starting because it is expensive to get it.”Farmers did report benefits from the quota system, including protection and stabilization for Montana’s dairy industry. Because the quota system in the state requires processors to first utilize Montana milk for Class I fluid use, it provides a guaranteed market for dairy farmers.Without this, many farmers I spoke with felt like Montana would be flooded with out-of-state milk, particularly given the proximity of Idaho and Washington. Smaller farmers felt like quota has protected them from the bigger dairies because everybody’s milk is worth the same amount.Farmers also noted the stability quota has provided, which is practically unheard of in the U.S. dairy industry. Not only has it ensured a market, the quota system has encouraged farmers to produce at a level matching their quota, which makes it easier for processors to plan.It would be easy to assume that in areas with supply management, there would be a greater number of small farms when compared to non-quota areas because of the equalized pricing, but Montana is actually losing these farms at a rate slightly faster than the national average.The Montana industry is growing in the mid-scale category of 200 to 499 cows, where on the national level, this scale is also declining. The category of 500 to 999 cows shows explosive growth in Montana, but this is slightly misleading because it is only a change from one to four farms.While there are no dairies in the state that have herds of 1,000 or more cows, it may only be a matter of time, as more farmers continue to retire and the remaining dairies increase their herds.So the question remains: Are supply-managed dairy industries more stable and better off than free-market dairy industries? In Montana’s case, this question is difficult to answer because it is one state in a dairy-producing nation.Because Montana operates with the Federal Milk Market Order (FMMO) pricing as a guide, it is not entirely separated from national and international supply and demand signals, and quota on its own does not necessarily affect the farm-gate price of milk.Also, Montana cannot turn away dairy products from other states, so the market sells both Montana-made and imported dairy products.Despite this, Montana’s dairy industry is not thriving. A continued loss of farms, processing only for fluid milk and uncertainty about the future still haunt the state’s dairy farmers.When asked about the future of Montana’s dairy industry, farmers answered one of two ways: Three farmers said it is going to stay exactly the same as it is now, while 14 thought there will be fewer and bigger farms.As it stands currently, quota may be helping Montana dairy farms stay viable in the near future, but questions about long-term survival remain.On a national level, supply management of the dairy industry may make sense, but there are a lot of variables to consider. The U.S. generally prides itself on a free-market economy, and supply management is the antithesis of that.Some farmers feel as though supply-managed systems cause consumer prices to rise, which is the case in Canada, and that in itself would make a national quota system unlikely to pass. The other issue with a national quota policy is whether it would control all milk, like Canada’s system, or only fluid milk, like Montana’s system.If controlling price swings on the farmer’s end was the goal, then a system like Canada’s would be a better fit. If the U.S. wanted to limit Class I production and keep it more in line with demand, then perhaps a system like Montana’s would work better.On the other end of the spectrum, the U.S. could remove subsidies, tariffs and FMMOs and let the dairy industry operate under a free-market policy. New Zealand did this in the 1980s, and since then farmers have learned to respond to international market signals and adjust their production accordingly.The effects of supply management vary by farm size and intent of the farm operator, and change the ways some farmers make decisions on their farm.Understanding the ways that quota affects individual farmers may help lead to better, more responsive dairy policy in Montana and on the national level.But for now and into the foreseeable future, Montana dairy farmers will operate under their supply management system. While most of Montana’s dairy cows might be black and white, the issue of supply management is not so clear. PDLaura Ginsburg earned her M.S. from the University of Montana in 2013. She received a Fulbright scholarship to study dairy policy in New Zealand for 2014 and is also starting a small dairy in Montana.Several farmers noted that they could not think of one new dairy farm since the start of quota, with one farmer saying, ‘It is keeping young dairies from starting because it is expensive to get it.’ Illustration by Kevin Brown. Editor’s note: This is the second of a two-part series discussing how Montana’s supply management system operates and the effect it has had on the state’s dairy industry.advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

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September 24, 2020

Is the Browns’ Dream of Acquiring Patriots QB Jimmy Garoppolo Officially Over?

first_imgFrom one day to the next, nothing has ever been ‘for sure’ when it comes to the Browns desire to try and get the Super Bowl Champion New England Patriots to deal them backup quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo.From the moment the wild Super Bowl ended (or even before for that matter), there’s been rumblings about the Browns wanting to make a mega deal to get Garoppolo, a player who got a shot to show what he could do for a couple games while Tom Brady was suspended to start the year.Now though with the NFL draft closing in, the Browns and any other team wanting to get Garoppolo might have to wait a year, as NFL.com’s Ian Rapoport says that the Pats are not going to deal the backup.Here’s the story: Now that Tony Romo has left Houston holding the bag at quarterback, might former Patriots assistant Bill O’Brien tempt New England into softening the stance that Jimmy Garoppolo is off the table in trade talks?“Of course Bill O’Brien would love to acquire someone as talented as Jimmy Garoppolo,” NFL Network Insider Ian Rapoport said on Thursday’s edition of Up to the Minute. “It would make a lot of sense. The system would be the same, the transition would be easy, everything would match up.”There’s only one problem.“From my understanding, the Patriots do not want to deal Jimmy Garoppolo,” Rapoport continued. “They really just don’t, whether it’s to the Browns, whether it’s to the Texans. Their stance right now … is they do not want to give up someone who they consider a franchise quarterback for a pick this year.”When Cleveland and New England discussed Garoppolo around the time of the NFL combine in late February, Garafolo added, the Patriots offered no indication that the former Eastern Illinois star would be available.We’ve been hearing for weeks that Cleveland’s front office has yet to give up the Garoppolo ghost.“The Browns may make a late run at Garoppolo,” Rapoport explained, “but they do not seem to believe there’s any hope there.”The Browns as everyone knows do have quite a few picks still to play with, so never say never. For now though, it looks like the brown and orange signal thrower is either already on the roster, or a player that is going to get drafted come the final week in April. Related TopicsBrownsJimmy GaroppoloTexans Matt Loedecenter_img Matt Loede has been a part of the Cleveland Sports Media for over 21 years, with experience covering Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association, the National Football League and even high school and college events. He has been a part of the Cleveland Indians coverage since the opening of Jacobs/Progressive Field in 1994, and spent two and a half years covering the team for 92.3 The Fan, and covers them daily for Associated Press Radio. You can follow Matt on Twitter HERE.last_img read more

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