September 30, 2019

What The Russian Scandal Tells Us About The State Of Doping In

More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed FiveThirtyEight Embed Code Welcome to the latest episode of Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight’s sports podcast. On this week’s show (July 19, 2016), we chat with FiveThirtyEight’s Christie Aschwanden about the Russian doping scandal and ask her whether it is a sign that the World Anti-Doping Agency is falling down on the job. We then talk to Rob Arthur about why the home run has returned to baseball, and he walks us through his investigation into the mystery. Finally, we welcome Jacob Wolf from ESPN Esports to tell us about Juan “Hungrybox” DeBiedma, the new champion of Super Smash Bros. Melee, and we ask him if this means Hungrybox has gone from being a god to a G.O.A.T. Plus, a significant digit on ex-MLB players entering a tournament against a bunch of college kids.Links to what we discuss are here:Christie Aschwanden asks if it’s fair to ban all Russian athletes from the Olympics.The New York Times in May reported on a whistleblower’s allegations that Russian athletes were doping at the 2014 Olympics.The Guardian breaks down what we learned from the World Anti-Doping Agency’s report on Russia this week.Rob Arthur and Ben Lindbergh wrote about the return of the home run before the MLB season started. Look for the follow-up on FiveThirtyEight soon.The New York Times breaks down all the theories about why there’s been a rise in home runs.Jacob Wolf explains the significance of Hungrybox’s win at the Evolution Championship Series.Tyler Erzberger describes the drama of the night as Hungrybox clinched the title with a last-minute victory.Ben Casselman looked at the growth of eSports in ESPN The Magazine.Significant Digit: 100. That’s the number of games that Adam LaRoche’s team full of former Major League Baseball players would win if they were playing together at their peak. LaRoche’s Kansas Stars will play in the National Baseball Congress World Series this summer. The tournament features mostly college summer teams. If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong. read more

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September 30, 2019

Phillies Jimmy Rollins Called Out For Not Hustling

The losing is getting to Philadelphia Phillies all-star Jimmy Rollins. And when it manifested itself in a lack of hustle, it did not go over well with manager Charlie Manuel, who had a private meeting with the second-baseman to let his disenchantment known.“We have two rules: Hustle and be on time,” Manuel told reporters. “We’ll see. That’s all I have to say. This is between Jimmy and me.”Rollins jogged slowly up the first-base line after hitting a routine grounder to shortstop in the sixth inning of Wednesday’s loss to the Miami Marlins.Rollins said, “I was just upset before I even got up there (to bat),” Rollins said. “I was already out of it. Mentally, just upset.”He did not explain what he meant by “upset,” but also said that it was “not an excuse” for not running hard.Manuel admitted he considered benching Rollins but opted against it because he wanted to win the game.“After talking to him, I think he’s ready to play,” Manuel said. “He should be running hard from now on. We’ll see.”According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, three team sources believe it is a problem that not one player in the Phillies’ veteran-laden clubhouse chastised Rollins.One of the sources told the newspaper that Rollins has been cited for lack of hustle in the past, but it went overlooked due to the Phillies’ overall success.The five-time defending National League East champion Phillies (54-64) trail the first-place Washington Nationals by 19 games in the division standings and are 11 games out of a wild-card spot. Rollins said his lack of hustle has been magnified due to the Phillies’ disappointing season.“Those things only come about when you lose, and that’s the truth,” Rollins said. “Nobody said nothing the day before when you win, or when you go from first to third on a ground ball up the middle, or when you score (from first base) on a ball hit down the line.” read more

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September 28, 2019

Mark McMorris Is One Of The Best X Games Athletes Of All

When I met Mark McMorris, he seemed pretty unassuming. The 23-year-old Canadian spoke quietly but with a casual confidence as he asked about my day. I walked away thinking, “Nice kid.” Then I saw what he could do on a snowboard and found it impossible to reconcile that insane hell-man with the guy I was just talking to.That’s Mark, and at the winter X Games in Aspen, Colorado — which started on Thursday — he could cement himself as one of the all-time greats.In his two disciplines — slopestyle and big air — McMorris won 11 medals in his first 12 X Games starts, between 2011 and 2016. Six of those medals were gold, and five were silver (he finished one competition in fourth place). Considering all his X Games finishes, his average is an impressive 1.66 (where an average of 1.00 would be finishing first every time, 2.00 would be finishing second every time, etc., so lower is better),There’s only one athlete in X Games history that has a better average in his first 12 starts, said Grace Coryell, a spokesperson for the X Games.1FiveThirtyEight is owned by ESPN, which also runs the X Games. That’s BMX legend Dave Mirra, who had an insane average of 1.25 between 1995 and 2000 (nine golds, three silvers).2If McMorris manages to win gold in both of his events in Aspen this year, his average will improve to 1.57 over 14 starts. That would be the same 14-game start average as Mirra, who finished first and sixth in his 13th and 14th starts, respectively.McMorris isn’t just incredibly good — he’s incredibly good and incredibly consistent. If we look at the finals for the X Games slopestyle event, in which an athlete’s top ride of three attempts is the score that counts, McMorris’s average score is 94.19, Coryell told me. (The best possible score is 100.) Most X Games competitors scored 90 or above — in 2015 slopestyle, only three riders did in the finals; in 2016, only two did.At last year’s Aspen X Games, McMorris won the slopestyle event by being the first rider ever to perform back-to-back triple corks. (A cork is when athletes add a flip as they spin in the air.) In his winning run, McMorris did a triple cork with 1,440 degrees of rotation spinning counter-clockwise, followed immediately by another triple cork 1440 spinning clockwise. It’s as hard as it sounds to do one, let alone two in succession. It looked like something out of a video game, which, incidentally, is something McMorris has his name on as of October, 2016.He’s had a lot of time to practice such feats. McMorris said he first tried snowboarding at the age of 5, tried it again at 6 and then started doing it consistently at the ripe old age of 7. He started launching off the big, scary jumps when he was about 13. I asked how he was able to huck himself over the ledge when he was so young. Is it just because kids are light and rubbery and fearless at that age? He laughed and said that kids are progressing far faster these days, noting that last year an 8-year-old managed to land a double-backflip, but yes, being rubbery helps.He probably wouldn’t have minded being a bit more rubbery last year.At Shaun White’s Air + Style competition in Los Angeles in February of 2016, McMorris launched into what looked to be a perfect frontside 1440 triple cork, until he over-rotated slightly and came down on his butt. He rode out of it, but something wasn’t right. The toe-side edge of his board caught in the snow, causing it to stop while his considerable momentum carried his body forward. The torque on his body snapped his femur.“With the injury — it took like half a year or seven months — you get that much more mentally strong,” McMorris told me. “It was a freak accident, and the more you dwell on it, the longer it’s going to take, and the more scared you’ll be of everything.”Although he still has a little nagging pain from the surgery, he said his body feels stronger than it’s ever been, and so far, his results back that up. His first event since his injury was a big air competition in Milan, Italy, in November of 2016, eight and a half months after breaking his leg. He took bronze with a perfect backside triple 1440. From there, he went to Pyeongchang, South Korea, for a big air test event for the 2018 Winter Olympics. He came in first. “That’s when I started to feel like, ‘OK, he’s back; it’s going to be all good,’” McMorris said, smiling. In December, he logged a win in a slopestyle event at the Dew Tour in Breckenridge, Colorado.The winter X Games will be his biggest test yet. The big air final is Friday at 10 p.m. Mountain time, and the slopestyle final is Sunday at noon MT. He certainly seems ready for them. read more

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September 28, 2019

OSU football one of many

As a student athlete at the largest university in the world, with the largest athletic department in the world, there are many things to be proud of. While competing on the men’s volleyball team, I’ve learned there’s nothing better than playing on our home court in front of a lively Buckeye crowd.Although I don’t play basketball or football, where nearly all the glory lies, representing such an outstanding university in my sport is an honor. Personally, one of my favorite parts of being an athlete at Ohio State is the friendships that have evolved within my team, with athletes from other sports and with people who appreciate what I do.As my time here at Ohio State has passed, I have found that I’ve greatly increased my support for all 36 sports Ohio State offers.The athleticism and excitement of each sport never fail to amaze me. Just last weekend I attended a field hockey match, where I found myself jumping out of my seat screaming in support of our team as they took the lead with 7 seconds left. Merely an hour after that, I found myself at a soccer game going nuts as we conquered our rivals from up north.I think part of the reason my enthusiasm for each sport has increased so much over the years is because at nearly every sporting event I attend, I have a friend on the court or field, who I’m cheering for to pull out the win. I’ve really enjoyed supporting all of Ohio State’s fall sports this quarter, and I look forward to cheering on sports like our National Champion synchronized swimming team, runner-up tennis team, outstanding gymnastics teams and reigning Big Ten Champion baseball team in the winter and spring. My team has also been successful, having returned to the Final Four this year for the second consecutive year.So come on out and support all 36 teams with me, and watch our fellow Buckeyes dominate the competition. In my opinion, the only thing better than having a rowdy crowd cheering you on is having friends pulling for you on the sideline.In an effort to bring together students and student-athletes, the Sportsmanship Council and Student Athlete Advisory Board are hosting an athlete meet and greet. The event will kick off at 6 p.m. today outside the RPAC and will feature athletes from nearly all 36 sports.So come on out and get to know some phenomenal athletes and all-around cool people. I hope to see you there. read more

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September 28, 2019

Buckeye Bullets What to expect from Ohio State Eastern Michigan

Week 4 of Ohio State’s season is being brought to you by cupcakes, the official dessert of the Buckeyes’ schedule for the next couple of weeks. After hosting Eastern Michigan, winless during the last 22 months, OSU plays Illinois and Indiana, who combined for just three conference wins in 2009. The Buckeyes shut out the Illini in the rain last September, 30-0. A week later, they crushed the Hoosiers 33-14. So far this year, Illinois is 2-1, having knocked off in-state rivals Northern and Southern Illinois. Indiana, at 2-0, beat Towson and Western Kentucky. Obviously, neither Big Ten lowlife has faced an opponent anywhere near OSU’s caliber. Don’t expect coach Jim Tressel to keep Terrelle Pryor and the first-team offense in the game for as long as he did last Saturday against Ohio. He’ll probably pull the plug on the starters at halftime, as he did a year ago against overmatched New Mexico State. Tressel wasn’t his usual conservative self last week. Pryor was still rolling out and throwing the ball deep downfield despite a 36-point lead in the third quarter. Look for OSU to rely more on the run game Saturday. It could be the first extensive backfield action for Jaamal Berry, once Dan Herron, Brandon Saine and Jordan Hall get their touches during the first three quarters. Eastern Michigan allows an average of 253 rushing yards per game. Expect Tressel to take advantage of that and give his Heisman-contending quarterback a bit of a week off. The defense should feast on Eastern Michigan’s tendency to commit turnovers. OSU picked off Miami (Fla.) quarterback Jacory Harris four times, then forced five Bobcat turnovers last week. Eastern Michigan has turned the ball over eight times in three games. read more

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September 28, 2019

Ohio State defense preparing for aerial assault from Penn State

OSU senior linebacker Curtis Grant (14), junior linebacker Joshua Perry (37) and senior defensive lineman Steve Miller (88) pursue Rutgers senior quarterback Gary Nova (10) during a game on Oct. 18 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won, 56-17.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorAnyone who has paid attention to the Ohio State football team in the last three years under coach Urban Meyer is likely aware of the scrutiny the Buckeye defense has undergone.The 2014 edition of the OSU defense has improved statistically from last season as the Buckeyes, which ranked 47th in total defense last season, now fall in at 15.The pass defense, which finished the 2013 season ranked 112th overall (out of 125 teams) has made the jump to No. 16 in the country.While the numbers show drastic improvement, junior linebacker Joshua Perry said the Buckeyes can play even better than they have to this point.“We all know that we are not as good as we could be right now,” Perry said Monday. “That’s the kind of interesting thing is we have been playing really well and we have been beating teams by a lot, but we still have a way to go.”The Buckeyes will likely be tested through the air early and often Saturday as they are scheduled to take on the Penn State Nittany Lions, who currently second in the Big Ten standings in passing yards per game.Leading the way for the Nittany Lions is sophomore quarterback Christian Hackenberg, who is averaging 272.8 yards passing per game.Meyer acknowledged that if the Buckeyes are to come out of State College, Pa., with a win, they will have to slow down Hackenberg.“Obviously we got a lot of respect for that big quarterback, Hackenberg,” Meyer said Monday. “Tremendous player. Statistically came out of the chute high, high completion percentage. (Has recently) struggled a little bit. But he’s playing very well.”The struggles for Hackenberg have come in his last four games, as he has thrown just one touchdown in that span and the Nittany Lions have stumbled to a 4-2 (1-2) start.In his last game against Michigan, Hackenberg was sacked six times, finishing the game with -34 rushing yards on the night.Perry said continuing to get pressure on Hackenberg will be key if the Buckeyes are to slow him down.“That is going to be a big priority,” Perry said. “We saw how that worked out last year, we got after him a little bit and we had some success there so we are going to see what we can do against them. I know our D-line is pretty hungry so we will get after it.”OSU defensive line coach and long time Penn State assistant Larry Johnson said Monday that his unit, which has undergone losses this season with the suspension of junior Noah Spence and a recent injury to redshirt-senior Rashad Frazier, has seen less rotation because of that loss of personnel.“We’re playing six, seven guys. I am used to eight, nine,” Johnson said Monday. “It depends on the game, too. We have some young players that have to get ready. When you have good players, it’s tough to take those guys out.”In last year’s 63-14 win against the Nittany Lions, the Buckeye defensive line accounted for three of the four sacks on Hackenberg and brought pressure for most of the night as the Penn State quarterback completed just 12-of-23 passes, including two interceptions.Despite OSU’s success against Hackenberg in the past and his recent struggles, Perry said Hackenberg might be the best quarterback the Buckeyes will face all season.“He is a really good quarterback. He is up there at the top and he has done a pretty good job, especially being a young player stepping in there when he had to and taking the reins of the team,” Perry said. “I know that their coach and their team has a lot of confidence in him so he will be a challenge.”With so much emphasis being put on shutting down the Nittany Lions, Meyer said he is not worried about his players looking ahead two weeks to a matchup with No. 8 Michigan State.“I think if you play a really bad team, that happens. You try not to let that happen,” Meyer said. “Going on the road in front of 110,000 people, knowing we didn’t play great on Saturday (against Rutgers), we expect to play great.”Perry echoed his coach’s comments and added the mix of maturity and youth on the team is paying dividends.“We keep the focus because like I said before, we’ve got young guys who are hungry and they got something to prove so they want to play in every game and every situation and take advantage of it,” Perry said. “Our older guys are mature enough that we know that you can’t overlook any game and you can’t take winning for granted.”The Buckeyes and Nittany Lions are scheduled to square off in State College, Pa., Saturday at 8 p.m. at Beaver Stadium. read more

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September 28, 2019

Amy Scullion chooses to return to Ohio State womens basketball team

Then-redshirt-junior guard Amy Scullion looks for an open teammate during a Jan. 5 game against Michigan at the Schottenstein Center. OSU lost, 64-49.Credit: Lantern file photoWhen the final buzzer sounded for the Ohio State women’s basketball team last season, then-redshirt-junior guard Amy Scullion thought she had played her last game as a Buckeye.Despite having a year of eligibility left, Scullion made the choice to leave the team at the end of the season in order to focus on attending medical school at OSU. Everyone, including coach Kevin McGuff, thought they had seen the last of her.“When she stopped playing last year, we all thought that she was done,” McGuff said. “She had an extra year of eligibility obviously, but she was moving on to (medical) school which is an amazing deal.”It was a series of unfortunate events that led Scullion back to the team. It all started Oct. 15 when it was announced that freshman forward Makayla Waterman would miss the season because of an ACL injury. Toward the end of October, freshman forward Chelsea Mitchell suffered a torn ACL and less than a week later, redshirt-freshman guard Kianna Holland suffered a season-ending ACL injury of her own.With only seven available healthy players and limited options, McGuff and the coaching staff reached out to Scullion for help.“We were talking the week before the 31st and the following week is when I think we finally made a decision to go,” Scullion said.She said the decision to return to the team wasn’t an easy one. “(Medical) school was definitely very intense so it was a tough decision actually,” Scullion said. “I know this is a great opportunity, but it was something I had to wrap my mind around and know I could be successful at both.”Even though she had only been away from the team less than a year, the transition from being a medical school student to a college basketball player again was harder than she expected.“The first practice I came back, I remember I put on all my gear and I just felt like I was playing dress-up,” Scullion said. “In my mind, that chapter of my life was over and to be back was crazy.”Scullion averaged 3.1 points and 3.9 rebounds last season for the Buckeyes, and McGuff said he expects her to provide a spark for OSU. “She’s a really good defender, she’s a good rebounder, she’s a physical player,” McGuff said. “She’s a very, very bright player, I think she’ll just help us in giving us somebody that can allow us to rest some people a little bit more.”Scullion’s teammates also said they think she’ll provide a lot for the young team.“I think that she’ll bring a lot more energy to the team,” freshman forward Alexa Hart said. “I really think she’ll bring open shots more for everyone else, even creating shots for her own self.”While Hart did not play with Scullion last season, junior guard Ameryst Alston said having Scullion back will be beneficial for the entire team.“Amy is going to be a lot of help,” Alston said. “She works really hard and it’s just a blessing and we’re really happy to have her. I think she’s the most unselfish person ever to come back and help us.”Alston added that some of the players had asked Scullion about a potential comeback prior to her return.“We had seen her a couple days before just on campus,” Alston said. “We were asking her, just kind of joking around, ‘Oh you want to come back?’ and what do you know, she is back.”Scullion will have to wait until Sunday before she can officially take the court for OSU. The NCAA suspended Scullion for three games for an incident involving autograph signing that took place after she left the team.“The NCAA just didn’t like what I did after I graduated,” Scullion said. “It’s disappointing and I wish I could’ve played those three games but I’m glad I’m back, I’m glad they’re giving me this opportunity so I can’t complain much.”When she does get playing time, Scullion said she’s ready to slip into a new and more comfortable role.“I’m excited about my role this year because I think I can just go in, play hard, and that’s what I like to do anyways,” Scullion said. “There’s no pressure on me to have to score, I just go in, hopefully get some rebounds, and everyone’s happy.”With the demands that come from playing college basketball and being a student in medical school, Scullion plans on staying focused on her goals while making sacrifices along the way.“Right now for me the No. 1 priority is (medical) school, that has to come first,” Scullion said. “I just have to be super disciplined, make sure I’m staying up with my schoolwork, maybe not watch as much reality TV as I’d like.”Scullion will be eligible to play against Virginia Commonwealth on Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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September 28, 2019

Depth in the trenches becoming a concern for Urban Meyer Buckeyes

Then-sophomore offensive lineman Pat Elflein (left), then-junior center Jacoby Boren (50) and then-redshirt-freshman Billy Price (54) throw blocks against Alabama on Jan. 1 in New Orleans. OSU won, 42-35.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorThe Ohio State offensive and defensive fronts helped the Buckeyes to their eighth national title just three months ago, but coach Urban Meyer said he is concerned with both units as spring practice hits its halfway point.“We’re gonna have, like most teams across the country have offensive line issues,” Meyer said Tuesday after practice. “We have had some injuries, with (redshirt-freshman Demetrius) Knox being out, (redshirt-freshman Kyle) Trout had a contusion where he missed a couple days. Numbers are way down on the offensive line.”While the front five is set to return four starters from the title campaign, three of them are seeing limited to no reps.“Pat Elflein and Taylor Decker are getting very limited reps, Jacoby Boren is down. Nine or 10 offensive linemen will be here in August that aren’t here right now,” Meyer said.The other remaining starter, redshirt-sophomore Billy Price, has the most experience of any of the linemen who are participating full throttle in spring ball.But even with so many players sitting out, Elflein said offensive line coach and co-offensive coordinator Ed Warinner will continue to push the Buckeyes to get better.“He’s a perfectionist. He won’t let anything slip. No matter what it is, wrong step, whatever, hand placement, if it’s not perfect, he’s on you,” Elflein said Thursday. “I think that is probably his best quality and that’s why we’ve been playing so good. He has developed so many guys to be great players.”With Elflein, Decker and Boren sitting out most of spring practice, another loss suffered to the offensive line was not from injury, graduation or rest.Redshirt-senior Joel Hale, who came to OSU as a defensive lineman, moved to the offensive side of the ball for the 2014 season to assist with depth.Now, Hale is switching back to his original position on the defensive front, which saw Michael Bennett and Steve Miller graduate. Hale saw playing time in OSU’s first four games of 2014, but did not see the field in any games after the Cincinnati game because of injury.Meyer said Hale’s willingness to once again move positions has been a valuable asset to the OSU squad.“I just have great respect for guys (like Joel). He’s a competitor. He’s tough. And he goes hard. Now we just have to find the right place for him,” Meyer said. “It was a mutual conversation we had and we have a lot of respect for Joel Hale around here.”Hale will join up with a relatively inexperienced group (outside of junior Joey Bosa and senior Adolphus Washington), and will likely see a lot of reps with Washington being limited in practice, Meyer said.He added that in Washington’s place, redshirt-sophomore Tyquan Lewis is getting the reps opposite of Bosa with the first-team defense, but redshirt-sophomores Michael Hill, Donovan Munger, sophomore Jalyn Holmes and redshirt-freshmen Darius Slade and Sam Hubbard have shown improvement.“We have bodies at the position, but we aren’t even close to where we need to be,” Meyer said. “Are they trying and getting better? Yes.”The Buckeyes will have a chance to showcase their talents on April 18 during the annual Spring Game at Ohio Stadium before kicking off the 2015 regular season against Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., on Sept. 7. read more

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September 28, 2019

Mens basketball 2018 threestar point guard Duane Washington Jr commits to Ohio

For the second time in as many days, Ohio State has landed a recruit in the 2018 class. The Buckeyes secured the commitment of three-star point guard Duane Washington Jr. Wednesday evening.The 6-foot-3, 190-pound guard is regarded as the 290th-best prospect in the nation, 55th-best at his position and 32nd-best in the state of California, according to 247Sports composite rankings. Washington turned down reported offers from Michigan, Oregon, Michigan State and others.He first received an offer from Ohio State on Aug. 20 and visited the school on Aug. 15. Washington, who is originally from Grand Rapids, Michigan, joins four-star forward Jaedon LeDee as the only two recruits committed to first-year coach Chris Holtmann’s 2018 recruiting class.

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September 28, 2019

Track and Field Ohio State dominates second day of Jesse Owens Classic

Ohio State did not just host the Jesse Owens Classic. The Buckeyes owned it.They dominated in both track events and field events this weekend for their only outdoor home meet of the season with nearly 50 teams competing. “We were aggressive today, dominant today,” track and field director Karen Dennis said. “But we have to continue to work hard, dig deeper, get better so that we can be dominant in the Big Ten.”Women’s Recap Ohio State’s sophomore Annie Ubbing and senior Aziza Ayoub led the first lap of the 800-meter race, running shoulder-to-shoulder. On the last lap, Ubbing took the lead and won with a time of 2:05.79, beating her personal best. Ubbing’s record is the 19th-fastest time in the country. “After I finished, I actually had no idea I ran that fast, but I felt really good,” Ubbing said. “Going into it, I was like just get through 600 and keeping going and just hang on for dear life. But it’s very exciting.”Ubbing added that running neck and neck with Ayoub made it feel like the two were working in tandem, instead of competing against each other. “I felt Aziza was the last two 100-meters and then the other two girls started passing me and I was kind of like, ‘OK just stay with it,’” Ubbing said. “But not so much me versus her, it was just like go with her.”Ubbing was not the only Buckeye to put up a strong performance. Freshman Anavia Battle placed first in the 100-meter dash with a time of 11:56 seconds. In the 4×100-meter dash, sophomore Halimah Barlow, senior Maggie Barrie, senior Beatrice Hannan and Battle finished with a winning time of 44.92. Additionally, Barrie came in first in the 200-meter dash with a personal best time of 23.27 seconds, while her teammate, Battle, came in third at 23.66 seconds. Barrie, sophomore Halimah Barlow, sophomore Tamani Wilson and junior Karrington Winters won the 4×400-meter relay with a time of 3:42:01.Junior Mikaela Seibert won the triple jump with a total of 12.48 meters. In the 100-meter dash, Chantel Ray placed second with a time of 13.61 seconds.Men’s Recap Despite his shortest jump of the year, senior Zack Bazile took first place in long jump with a leap of 7.35 meters.Ohio State athletes swept the 100-meter dash, with Bazile, freshman Eric Harrison and senior Duan Asemota filling up the platform.Bazile finished in first with a time of 10.35 seconds, Harrison took the silver at 10.45 and Asemota came in third at 10.49.Bazile, Harrison, sophomore Asa Burke and freshman Tavonte Mott combined in the 4×100-meter relay to run a first-place time of 40.17 seconds. Burke won the 200-meter dash with a personal-best time of 21.10 and senior Drelan Bramwell came in second with a personal-best 21.12-second time.Freshman Andre Jeff finished in first place with a time of 46.89 seconds in the 400-meter dash, with Burke trailing behind two spots at third at 47.24 seconds.In the 4×400-meter relay, sophomore Terry Johnson, Harrison, sophomore Keilan Beachman and senior Drelan Bramwell placed first at 3:13.92.Dajuan Seward leapt 14.80 meters to win triple jump and placed second with a 14.05-second time in the 110-meter hurdles.In shot put, Nick Demaline placed first with a throw of 19.86 meters. In the pole vault, Ohio State teammates Cole Gorski and Coty Cobb had a jump-off for the top two spots. Gorski came in first, clearing 5.27 meters, and Cobb came in second after making it over 5.12 meters. read more

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