October 18, 2020

The only way is up

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October 18, 2020

The origins of the UK’s first logistics park

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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October 18, 2020

Remarks by CARICOM Secretary-General Ambassador Irwin LaRocque to the Virtual…

first_img You may be interested in… CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak The Plan has the full endorsement of CARICOM Heads of Government and, in addition, Hemispheric Ministers of Agriculture have agreed to support the Region. I am concerned about what appears to be the abuse of such measures. This is an untenable situation that must be rectified if we are to make the requisite progress towards our goals.   St. Lucia records more cases of COVID In addition, due to job losses and reduced income, many consumers have had to reduce their expenditures and shift their consumption patterns to processed foods, much of which are imported.  CARICOM has adopted a Multi-Lateral Air Services Agreement (MASA) which could potentially assist the sector, but efforts to develop the regional maritime transportation sector continue to be challenging.  It is an area that is crying out for investment, but so far has not attracted sufficient interest from the private sector. Oct 16, 2020 Oct 16, 2020 Circumstances now dictate a greater emphasis on building capacity towards greater self-sufficiency in the agri-food sector.  This reality is even more urgent, given the onset of the annual hurricane season which is forecasted to bring several severe storms to the Region. CARICOM Secretary-General Ambassador Irwin LaRocque Today’s discussions could not be more timely and relevant, as the Region, like the rest of the world grapples with the health, economic and social issues arising out of the impact of the on-going COVID-19 pandemic. Support for CARICOM Agri-Food and Food Security Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic This crisis has, however, provided us with an opportunity to build resilience and enhance our food security. We must take actions that would ensure that we produce the food supplies to sustain our Region, along with the necessary capacity to distribute such supplies.  It is our chance to reach for the goal of reducing our food import bill by 25 percent within the next 5 years. It is my hope that the current project funded by the European Union and being implemented by the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA), in partnership with key Regional Institutions, will assist in addressing that constraint. Long term actions include the promotion of scientific and technological innovations across all aspects of the agriculture value chain, as well as strategies to create an information and statistical system to support evidence-based decision-making, and to strengthen the financial architecture surrounding agriculture and agribusiness. the creation of a trade and information portal for Member States and the private sector to access information with the aim of linking excess production with food deficits throughout the Region; The collapse of tourism, along with the shrinkage of the food service sector, has resulted in an unwelcome surplus of certain agricultural supplies (poultry, vegetables, fish) in several Member States. The pandemic undoubtedly has brought about an unprecedented shock to the Region’s agri-food system. The Plan outlines interventions to be undertaken by Member States and regional organisations to treat with the immediate agri-food supply needs arising from the fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic, and to strengthen the Region’s food and nutrition security in the ensuing years. Our major initiative is the CARICOM COVID-19 Agri- Food Security Action Plan, which was prepared by the CARICOM Secretariat, in collaboration with partner organisations, including IICA, the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and the Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI). Implementation will be under the leadership of the COVID-19 Food Security Taskforce, which is chaired by Honourable Saboto Caesar Minister of Agriculture of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. I want to thank Minister Caesar for his leadership and his presentation to the Heads of Government when they approved the Plan. center_img The measures to combat the pandemic are resulting in a large contraction in economic activity globally and the effect is disproportionately deeper in the Caribbean. Oct 15, 2020 The other major constraint impeding the growth of trade in the sector is transportation.  A study conducted by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) found that CARICOM intra-regional trade can double if we address issues relating to transportation, trade facilitation and SPS measures. The necessary social distancing and stay-at-home orders have contributed to agricultural market disruption, particularly, regarding harvest and the sale of fresh produce, meat, fish and a range of other value-added agri-food products. The regional private sector has been working with governments to devise strategies to build resilience and enhance food security. Dialogue has been initiated at the highest level, our Heads of Government, with the CARICOM Private Sector Organisation (CPSO) which has submitted a plan for increasing investment in the agri-food sector in order to reduce the food import bill. The CPSO is also part of the Regional COVID-19 Food Security Task Force, which includes representation from Member States and Regional Institutions. Among the immediate actions included in the Plan are: Oct 15, 2020 In laying out the plans and actions being undertaken to fulfil the goals of resilience and security, I do so fully aware that accomplishing them requires the co-operation and assistance of our Development Partners. The recovery from this crisis depends on no country or region being left behind. Circumstances now dictate a greater emphasis on building capacity towards greater self-sufficiency in the agri-food sector.  This reality is even more urgent, given the onset of the annual hurricane season which is forecasted to bring several severe storms to the Region.CARICOM Secretary-General Ambassador Irwin LaRocque The Region must now place maximum emphasis on restoring and facilitating intra-regional trade in agri-food products.  To do so, a system for actively linking buyers to sellers needs to be put in place, along with removing technical barriers to intra-regional trade. promoting the availability of relevant planting material, agricultural inputs and livestock feeds. Remarks by CARICOM Secretary-General Ambassador Irwin LaRocque to the Virtual Meeting of CARICOM Ministers of Agriculture, Financial Institutions, Donor Organisations and Donor Countries intervention by the Caribbean Agricultural Health and Food Safety Agency (CAHFSA) and national Agricultural Health and Food Safety (AHFS) authorities in implementing SPS measures and protocols to facilitate intra-regional agri-food trade; and Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC These are measures that have been initiated by CARICOM Governments, as we seek not only to respond to the immediate challenge posed by COVID-19, but also to build our resilience in the agri-food sector and to enhance our food security. We are committed to doing everything we can to help ourselves, but this is not a crisis that can be defeated by countries on their own and your support is crucial to our successful recovery. I look forward to working with the agencies attending this Session in our quest to achieve our aims Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… More deaths from COVID-19 recorded in CARICOM countries,… ‘We Have Done Fairly Well in Containing COVID-19’ – CARICOM Secretary-GeneralSecretary General of the Caribbean Community Ambassador Irwin LaRocque said the Region has done fairly well in containing COVID-19. He was speaking during the virtual Handing-over Ceremony of Chairmanship of the Conference of the Heads of Government of CARCIOM on Friday, 3 July. Ambassador LaRocque outlined that protocols had been…July 3, 2020In “Agriculture”Caribbean Ministers of Agriculture Explore Funding Options to Mitigate Effects of the Pandemic on AgricultureIICA and the CARICOM Secretariat organized a virtual meeting that included the participation of high-level authorities of the agriculture sector, representatives of financial institutions, development organizations and donors. San Jose, 8 June (2020) The ministers and secretaries of Agriculture of 14 Caribbean countries learned about funding opportunities they will be able…June 9, 2020In “Agriculture”Chile to multiply contributions to the Region(CARICOM Secretariat, Turkeyen, Greater Georgetown, Guyana)     In presenting his Letters of Credence to Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretary-General, Ambassador Irwin LaRocque, new Ambassador of Chile to CARICOM, H.E. Fernando Schmidt said the Caribbean will benefit next year when his country multiples its contribution to the United Nations Development Fund (UNDP). While…October 17, 2014In “CARICOM”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

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October 6, 2020

Bibby Line Group to Host Maritime and Offshore Events in Liverpool

first_imgLiverpool headquartered global company Bibby Line Group is hosting a series of events at this year’s International Festival For Business during the Maritime, Logistics and Energy thematic of the four- week programme.Being held at the Museum of Liverpool on the 12th June, the day includes two industry seminars tackling challenging current issues, followed by an invitation-only VIP reception.From 3.30pm until 6pm delegates, including senior managers involved in the logistics industry, will discuss the most pressing issues in the supply chain and logistics industries and consider the various ways in which leading companies within the industry have overcome these challenges, both on a national and international stage. The seminar – entitled ‘Co-opetition within the Supply Chain; are you making the most of it?’ – will conclude with a question and answer session with some of Europe’s most important supply chain leaders.Meanwhile from 4pm to 6pm, Bibby Line will be hosting a seminar called ‘Global Skills Shortage: changing the maritime and offshore industry’. Delegates attending the event will have the opportunity to listen to some of the industry’s most respected and influential thought leaders, and hear their views on how the industry can bridge the gap.The seminar is expected to be of particular interest to senior management and business leaders from the international maritime and offshore industry.The day will conclude with an invitation-only VIP drinks reception where Bibby Line Group, official sponsors of the IFB’s MLE thematic, will welcome guests with ‘Fab Four’ cocktails in the museum, which overlooks Liverpool’s historic Pier Head area, renowned for its trio of buildings – the Royal Liver Building, the Cunard Building and the Port of Liverpool Building – which are collectively referred to as the Three Graces. These buildings are recognised as being the symbol of Maritime Liverpool and are regarded as contributing to one of the most impressive waterfronts in the world.Sir Michael Bibby, Managing Director of Bibby Line Group, said: “We are proud to be hosting these events during this important and high profile business festival in Liverpool. It is a great opportunity to bring together our marine, logistics, offshore wind farm, oil and gas businesses whilst also showing how our financial services and our other divisions can help support suppliers in these industries.” Press Release, May 09, 2014; Image: Osiris Projectslast_img read more

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October 6, 2020

Epic Gas Seals Refinancing Deal for 14 LPG Carriers

first_imgSingapore-headquartered owner and operator of gas carriers Epic Gas has closed a contract for a new USD 90 million facility intended to refinance 14 LPG carriers.The refinancing deal has been inked with ABN AMRO Bank N.V., DVB Bank SE Singapore Branch and Norddeutsche Landesbank.Epic Gas said that the facility has an advance rate of 55% of the fair market value of the underlying vessels and matures in 2024.“Proceeds from the facility were used to repay amounts outstanding under the company’s existing facilities with DVB Bank and Norddeutsche Landesbank expiring in December 2017 and 2019/2020, respectively,” the company said.With completion of the refinancing, the company has no refinancing requirements until 2019.The announcement comes just a few days after the company welcomed into the fleet the eight and final LPG carrier, the 11,000 cbm LPG carrier Epic Salina, constructed by Japanese shipbuilder Kyokuyo Shipyard.According to the company’s information, since the first quarter of 2013 Epic Gas has grown its fleet by 270 percent.The company owns and operates a fleet of 41 fully pressurized gas carriers with an average vessel size of 6,559 cubic metres.last_img read more

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September 29, 2020

Women in construction: we’ve come so far, but there’s so much further to go

first_img“Managements must reorganise not only their thinking but their factories to give women their rightful place alongside the men to play a responsible part in industrial life. Although they do not say so in so many words, the employers in general do not regard women as capable of equal work and that makes the achievement of equal pay a difficult task”. This excerpt from the Shields Daily News dated 16 March 1955 – it might require some adjustment but it remains too current for comfort. Women today aren’t so much faced with barriers to entry into the professions as advancing to the higher ranksThe story’s headline, “Women are here to stay”, is over 60 years old. To me, it is a stark reminder of how far we’ve come but also of how much further we have yet to go to achieve parity for women across all walks of life and, importantly, at all levels of seniority. For a century now women have “quietly but persistently” worked to find a place for themselves in trades and the professions. And history can teach us that they did this on merit alone, pushing aside each new obstacle (however absurd!) thrown in their path like stones in the road to clear the way for future generations. But the time has now come to lift perhaps the biggest obstacle of all – to give women the decision-making roles they are clearly capable of holding but not at a discounted rate to that of a man in a similar role.Women today aren’t so much faced with barriers to entry into the professions as advancing to the higher ranks. In 1905, we could talk of the curious fact of London having “several women builders, two or three women architect” – so there’s no doubt we’ve come a long way. For the most part of the last century, women were prevented from entering the professions either by legislation, or by outright discrimination – factories were prevented from employing women builders, for example, unless there were insufficient men available. They weren’t allowed to work night shifts which prevented women engineers from holding supervisory roles and thus potential leadership positions.History can teach us that they did this on merit alone, pushing aside each new obstacle (however absurd!) thrown in their path like stones in the road to clear the way for future generationsNowadays, it is women’s advancement to positions of leadership and securing equal pay that have remained stubborn challenges. It is time that women celebrate their past and educate future generations – men and women – of their contribution to each economic sector over the years and demand the structural changes needed in the workplace to accommodate their leadership aspirations. Otherwise we will be forever caught in the invisible trap of “unconscious bias” and unequal pay, none of which are recent problems identified in blocking women from achieving equal success to men.We all – men and women – must update our thinking and adjust our business structures. Unlike the 1940s, when it was believed that ‘men build houses – but it is women who build homes”, in 2018 it is time that women and men build homes through shared parental responsibility, for example, so that women can build sustainable careers for themselves. It isn’t complicated and it starts with all of us accepting that “women are here to stay” and encouraging them to flourish professionally.Dana Denis-Smith is the CEO of Obelisk Support and the Founder of First 100 Years, a charity campaign seeking stories of pioneering women in industrylast_img read more

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September 29, 2020

Crowley adds heavy lift barges

first_imgThe new barges will be contracted and managed from the company’s recently opened Singapore office. Crowley says that they will allow it to better support regional customers in the oil and gas; mining; engineering, construction and procurement management (ECPM); and engineering, procurement, installation and commissioning (EPIC) industries who are increasingly embarking on large-scale onshore and offshore projects.The new 400 ft (122 m) long by 120 ft (36.5 m) wide HDBs, are moored in Batam, Indonesia. They have 25 ft (7.6 m) side shells, providing both the capacity and deck strength (up to 4,200 pounds per sq ft or 25 tonnes per sq m) needed to accommodate larger drilling and production units used for deepwater offshore energy exploration and development.They are designed with more robust ballast systems to deal with high tidal ranges found in the region’s load and discharge ports and have higher internal strength which allows tolerance when ballasting to the seabed, fully loaded – where tidal movement can be problematic.”Customers in this region require locally available and tailored assets for their project needs,” said William Hill, director, business development in Singapore. “The industry has expressed the need for available equipment to support larger construction and topside moves along with complex deck loads. These HDBs were designed to do just that.”The barges are ABS classed, with an approximate deadweight capacity of 20,000 tonnes, and were designed by Crowley’s Seattle-based, naval architecture and marine engineering subsidiary Jensen Maritime and constructed in China by Seabridge Marine Contractors and Jiangsu Yangzijang Shipbuilding.Crowley opened its Singapore-based project management and logistics solutions office in July this year, which was reported by HLPFI on August 1.  www.crowley.comlast_img read more

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September 28, 2020

Court lenient over seven-day delay in filing costs budget

first_imgA firm which filed its costs budget seven days late due to a change in fee-earner has been granted relief from sanctions on appeal.Sitting in Liverpool County Court, His Honour Judge Peter Gregory (pictured) said the district judge was wrong to have punished the breach of Civil Procedure Rules by refusing relief.In Murray v BAE Systems PLC, the claimant filed Form H with the court after hours on 24 August 2015, having been given a deadline of 19 August.Thompsons, representing the claimant in a personal injury case, told the court the failure to file and serve the costs budget was due to a lack of communication between the fee-earner on the case and her predecessor about who was responsible.A further reason advanced was the absence of an automatic diary entry system at the firm’s office to cater for orders.District judge Harrison said last August she accepted the explanation for the delay and that it arose from a genuine mistake rather than deliberate disregard for court rules.But she considered the total period of delay to be serious and significant, despite the breach having been an isolated one.The appeal against refusal to grant relief drew upon many of the landmark cases involving costs budgeting in recent years, including Mitchell, Denton and Long. Defendant firm DAC Beachcroft, arguing against relief from sanctions, said the margin of delay set this case apart from other cases where the courts had taken a more lenient approach.But claimant barrister Gordon Exall said the district judge had failed to properly address the materiality and significance of the breach.In this case, despite the seven-day delay, there was no ‘knock-on’ effect to the court timetable, as had been the case in Mitchell.HHJ Gregory found ‘considerable force’ in the claimant’s argument that the district judge erred in her approach in rejecting the consideration of consequences of the breach.‘If the breach in this case is properly classified as ‘serious and significant’, then in my judgement it must fall towards the bottom of any applicable scale or range,’ he said.He allowed the claimant’s appeal and allowed the claimant the costs of and incidental to the appeal.last_img read more

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September 28, 2020

Air-con inverter

first_imgSWISS Federal Railways is fitting the cab air-conditioning of 114 locos with seven VS-606V7 AC inverters supplied by Yaskawa Electric in a €150000 order.As well as withstanding the mechanical stress from the vibrations of a moving train, the 4 kW inverters were initially tested on two locos to ensure there would be no problems with condensing water as trains pass from freezing winter temperatures to the relatively stable warmer temperatures in Switzerland’s long Alpine tunnels.Yaskawa Electric Europe, Germanylast_img

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